Category Archives: General Dentistry

General Dentistry

Healthy Mouth to Healthy Body Connection

Good teeth can keep your health bills low. They can do even more–they can help protect you from a whole host of health problems. The following are 5 good reasons why you should take great care of your teeth.

Heart Disease & Stroke
Several studies have established that inflammation and bacteria in the mouth and gums can travel into the bloodstream, leading to thickening of the arteries and increasing the risk of a heart attack. Build up of fatty plaques in the vessels can break off and go to the brain and cause a stroke.

Just brushing once a day instead of two times could increase the risk of heart disease by 70%. This is according to one recent study published in the British Medical Journal which analyzed data from over 11,000 adults. So for a healthy heart keep up a good dental hygiene.

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Posture can cause headache and jaw pain

Charlie Chaplin
Charlie’s posture?

We all know that good posture is important. Our parents reminded us every day and now we remind our children. Yet, many people don’t realize how posture affects their oral health. Yes, oral health!

Do you experience frequent headaches or pain in your lower jaw?  Then, check your posture and consult your dentist about temporomandibular (“jaw joint”) disorder (TMD), as recommended by the Academy of General Dentistry (AGD).

So, how is poor posture connected to your jaw joint pain? Improper posture places the spine in a position that causes stress to the jaw joint. When people slouch or hunch over, the lower jaw shifts forward, causing the upper and lower teeth to not fit together properly, and the skull moves back on the spinal column. Go ahead, as a test, try to slouch this one time and you will feel the pressure on your joint. Read More →

Tips for Healthy Baby Teeth

Kids dental check-up starts at age oneThe following are some practical tips for parents to prevent tooth decay in their children:

  • Take your infant to a dentist before the first birthday for an assessment of cavity risk, even if your child has only a few teeth.
  • In general, brush your children’s teeth  – 2 or younger — with a bit of fluoride toothpaste twice a day. At 2, start to use a pea-size amount of toothpaste.
  • Reduce snacking. Eating any starchy or sugary food causes the pH level in the mouth to drop sharply.  This leaves teeth acidic which is bad for the enamel.  The frequency of exposure to acid (i.e. frequent snacking) is more harmful to the tooth than just the sugar content of food. Generally, it takes about 20 minutes for the mouth to balance the pH level in the mouth, so take a break from snacking. Read More →

Dental Crisis in America

Dental_Visits_US_2011In the U.S., many people have access to the best oral health care in the world, yet millions are unable to get even the basic dental care they need.

The issue of lack of access to dental care is extremely serious because untreated oral diseases can lead to not only pain, infection, and tooth loss, but also contribute to an increased risk for serious medical conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, and poor birth outcomes.

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19 Dental Habits to Avoid

Chewing on Ice

person chewing ice

It’s natural and sugar free, so you might think ice is harmless. But munching on hard, frozen cubes can chip or even crack your teeth. And if your mindless chomping irritates the soft tissue inside a tooth, regular toothaches may follow. Hot foods and cold foods may trigger quick, sharp jabs of pain or a lingering toothache. Next time you get the urge for ice, chew some sugarless gum instead. Read More →